Tag Archives: American Fisheries Society

Finding Inspiration

Windsor, Ontario

Law Enforcement Committee Annual Meeting

I was eager to give the Law Enforcement Committee members a synopsis of my symposium at the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting last month. I described the objectives and structure of the symposium in addition to comments and questions generated by the audience. The committee members were pleased that they were well-represented at the fisheries meeting. The members also recognized the importance of maintaining this type of representation and exposure at future fisheries meetings. The committee members made me feel like my Fenske Fellowship project has been successful thus far. I think they are looking forward to see what we can do together in the future.

Sometimes I wonder if my research is going to produce meaningful results; results that can be used and will actually impact something or someone. Sitting in this meeting and listening to the questions, concerns, and stories discussed by the committee members reaffirmed, for me, that my research is important. I think I am finally at the point where I can successfully define meaningful research objectives and goals – without the experiences the Fenske Fellowship has provided for me, I fear this realization may have never come.

We ended the Law Enforcement Committee Meeting with another training. The objective of this training was to instruct the committee members on the proper identification of turtle species in the Great Lakes Basin Region. I do not encounter turtles very often in my research, so the species identification was difficult for me. My favorite turtle was the snapping turtle, mainly because it was the largest and most active of those we observed.

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A common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentine). Photo credit: Molly J. Good

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A wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta). Photo credit: Molly J. Good

LESSON #25: Fisheries law enforcement is just one component of fisheries management. All components must collaborate and work together to implement effective fisheries management.

LESSON #26: The GLFC Law Enforcement Committee is interested in learning about how it can improve fisheries law enforcement on a basin-wide scale.

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Presenting in Portland

Portland, Oregon

I just came back from the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon. The meeting was spectacular and I made a lot of progress on my Fenske Fellowship work.

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A nice, warm welcome from the city of Portland, Oregon. Photo credit: Molly J. Good

On Monday, August 17, 2015, I gave the first presentation in my symposium entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” Ten other presentations followed after mine. The symposium session was extremely well-attended, with approximately 20-40 individuals present at any one time, and each presenter was challenged with some excellent questions. I think we were successful in raising the profile of fisheries law enforcement on a national scale, and I am eager to pull together the research findings from this symposium into a manuscript for Fisheries Magazine. For a copy of any presentation in this symposium, please contact me at goodmoll@msu.edu.

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Enforcement Officer Mark Robbins presenting the last talk in this symposium, entitled, “Fisheries for the Future: How Can Law Enforcement Help Us Get There?” Photo credit: Molly J. Good

On Thursday, August 20, 2015, I showed a brief video entitled, “Legally Licensed: The Conservation Benefits of Buying a Fishing License” in the first AFS Film Festival. The idea for this video originated in one of the earlier meetings I participated in with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) Law Enforcement Committee.

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A snapshot of my brief video. If you would like to see the full version, please e-mail me at goodmoll@msu.edu. Photo credit: Steven Good

Lastly, I organized another Fenske Fellows get-together for the Fenske Fellowship Committee and past fellows. Fenske Fellowship Committee members Gary Whelan (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Jess Mistak (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Dr. Dana Infante (Michigan State University), and Fenske Fellows, Dr. Abigail Lynch (United States Geological Survey), Hanna Kruckman (Eastern Illinois University), Dr. Amy Schueller (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), me, and Andrew Carlson dined at the Hilton Hotel in Downtown Portland.

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(From L to R) Dr. Abigail Lynch, Hanna Kruckman, Jess Mistak, Molly Good, Andrew Carlson, Gary Whelan, Dr. Dana Infante, Elle Gulotty, Dr. Amy Schueller, and Ray Schueller.

LESSON #22: Nationally, law enforcement officers experience challenges in effective collaboration.

LESSON #23: Law enforcement success or effectiveness is hard to quantify.

LESSON #24: It is possible for your purse to be stolen anywhere, even in nice hotels.

View Molly’s presentation, “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability,” given the American Fisheries Society Meeting here.

View Molly’s summary of the AFS Law Enforcement Symposium entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” here. This summary appeared in Fisheries magazine in December, 2015.

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Shout Out

East Lansing, Michigan

My symposium for the upcoming 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting was named as one of the “most unique” symposia of the entire meeting!

LESSON #21: Bask even in the smallest of victories.

View Molly’s nomination for the “most unique” symposia of the AFS Annual Meeting here. This nomination appeared in Fisheries magazine in August, 2015.

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Project Planning

East Lansing, Michigan

I wanted to share some details about the two primary projects I have been working on…

Law Enforcement Symposium

With help from Bob Lambe (GLFC), Dr. Bill Taylor (MSU), and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC), I have designed a half-day symposium on fisheries law enforcement for the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting. The symposium is entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” I have asked nine individuals to be a part of this symposium, and they have all accepted my invitation. These individuals represent different sectors, ranging from federal and state law enforcement to provincial and tribal law enforcement programs. As part of this symposium, I have submitted an abstract for a presentation that I will give, entitled “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability.” I hope the AFS Organizing Committee understands the significance of this symposium and associated presentations and decides to include them as part of the final meeting agenda.

Strategic Evaluation of the GLFC Vision

Bob Lambe, Dr. Bill Taylor, John Beck (MSU), and I have met a few times to discuss the need for a joint meeting between the Commissioners and Secretariat to lead a strategic evaluation of the vision of the GLFC. We have tentatively planned to hold a retreat in Ann Arbor, Michigan in early April to talk about the role of the GLFC in the future facilitation of coordinated fisheries management in the Great Lakes Basin. John Beck and I have developed and discussed a detailed agenda5 for us to use at this retreat, which will guide the Commissioners and Secretariat in their discussions.

LESSON #17: An organization’s vision and mission should be evaluated often to make sure that the organization is maintaining its role and functioning effectively for now and for the future.

View Molly’s submitted abstract for her symposium, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” here.

View a list of Molly’s invited presenters and their affiliations, presentation titles, submitted abstracts, and brief biographies here.

View Molly’s submitted abstract for her presentation, “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability” here.

View Molly’s draft agenda for the GLFC Retreat here.

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Déjà Vu

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Board of Technical Experts Meeting: Pre-Proposals, Round 2

Well, folks, it is a new year and a new set of BOTE and SLRB meetings. Are they getting old yet, you might ask? You mean the long days, hours upon hours of listening and asking questions and making important decisions? Heck no, I love this stuff.

What a difference a year makes. Now, I know everyone in the room by their name and affiliation. I am no longer brand new to the process of discussing and reviewing proposals, which has allowed me to pay attention to bigger and better things. For example, instead of trying to figure out what a siscowet is (FYI, it is one of the three morphotypes or forms of lake trout in Lake Superior, and it is distinguished from the others because of its physical characteristics and presence in deep-water), I am making connections between climate change, hybridization, and siscowets.

So, you know the drill. If you are interested in reading a fuller description of what goes on during the winter BOTE meeting, please refer to “Fenske Firsts.”

This week, Bob Lambe (GLFC), Dr. Bill Taylor (MSU), and I had a long discussion about my involvement in a couple of projects related to my Fenske Fellowship work. First, we are all interested in raising the profile law enforcement as an important fisheries management tool. Working with the Law Enforcement Committee directly, I plan to submit a symposium for the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon. This symposium will bring together law enforcement officers and fisheries managers representing all sectors to discuss the importance of law enforcement in ensuring fisheries sustainability. Symposium abstracts are due in March 2015, so I will be working closely with Bob Lambe, Dr. Bill Taylor, and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) on abstract submissions. Second, as I mentioned in the last blog post, I will be assisting the GLFC in conducting a strategic evaluation of their organization’s vision and mission. Bob Lambe, Dr. Taylor, and I plan to work with a facilitator from Michigan State University (MSU), John Beck, to help conduct this evaluation with the Commissioners and Secretariat.

In other news, Julie Hinderer (Sea Lamprey Research Program Associate) and I teamed up once again to challenge Dr. Mike Jones (MSU) and Dr. Stu Ludsin (THE OSU) to an intense Euchre game. Boys won. Boo. 

Sea Lamprey Research Board Meeting: Full Proposals, Round 2

From Thursday, March 5 to Friday, March 6, 2015, I attended my second round of SLRB meetings. If you are interested in reading a fuller description of what goes on during the winter SLRB meeting, please refer to “Fenske Firsts.”

I should mention that today is my birthday. I guess I am a little sad that I have spent the past two birthdays of mine with the SLRB instead of with my family or friends, but this is real life. Actually, to be completely honest, this birthday was pretty special. Some of the readers may know that I greatly admire Dr. Steve Cooke (Carleton University) as a huge fisheries researcher role model in my life. Well, today he sang “Happy Birthday” to me. Julie Hinderer and Jess Ives (Program Associates) also presented me with a piece of cake. It was so awesome.

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My special slice of birthday cake. Cheers to 26! Photo credit: Molly J. Good

LESSON #11: Be adaptable.

LESSON #12: Appreciate constructive criticism.

LESSON #13: Seek mentors that both support and challenge you.

LESSON #14: The only real way to learn about how science is used to inform management and policy decisions is to immerse oneself in the process.

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Fenske Friends

Québec, Canada

Each year, at the American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting, past Fenske Fellows come together with the Fenske Committee for a get-together, whether it is a breakfast or luncheon. This is a great way for the Fenske Fellows to get to know each other and learn about each other’s research and past Fenske projects.

At the 144th American Fisheries Society Meeting in Québec, Canada, I organized a get-together with a group of past Fenske Fellows. We ate lunch at Bello Ristorante, a delicious Italian restaurant. Fenske Fellowship Committee Members, Dr. Dana Infante (MSU) and Jess Mistak (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), and past (and present) Fenske Fellows including Hanna Kruckman (Eastern Illinois University), Dr. Abigail Lynch (United States Geological Survey), Dr. Amy Schueller (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), Marissa Hammond (Michigan State University) and me dined together.

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(From L to R) Dr. Dana Infante, Dr. Amy Schueller, Marissa Hammond, Jess Mistak, Hanna Kruckman, Dr. Abigail Lynch, and Molly Good.

LESSON #5: Do not believe that GoogleMaps is always right.

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