Tag Archives: Fenske Fellowship

Trout Tales, 2016

Image courtesy Dave Herasimtschuk, Freshwaters Illustrated

Recently I’ve had a flurry of Fenske Fellowship activities, all of them memorable! After returning from the holiday break on January 6, I met with Troy Zorn, Michigan DNR Fisheries Research Biologist and Fenske mentor, on campus in East Lansing. We exchanged stories of our time away from work … mine back home in Minnesota with family and friends (with an awe-inspiring Rachel Carson biography in hand), and Troy’s on a marine fishing adventure! After recounting our holiday memories, we got down to business on Fenske developments, charting a course for a busy month of Inland Trout Angler Survey (ITAS) and Inland Trout Management Plan (ITMP) work. We both acknowledged the need for a formal document describing results from the ITAS and decided to format the summary as a Research Report, DNR style. Talk about fisheries management experience! So far, the Fenske Fellowship has provided unparalleled opportunities to see the fisheries world from an applied research and management perspective.

Troy and I decided that the Research Report should transcend mere description of ITAS results. We settled on a format that will both report results and compare them to previous angler surveys, including a recent survey completed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. We believe providing context for our results will enhance the utility of the Research Report for advancing stream salmonid management. Speaking of context, our analysis of the ITAS is occurring simultaneously with development of the ITMP and with publication of a manuscript (Carlson et al. 2016) that Troy and I co-authored with Dr. William W. Taylor (my Ph.D. advisor at Michigan State University), Dr. Dana Infante (MSU), and Kelsey Schlee (M.S., 2014, MSU). In this paper we predict future stream temperatures in Michigan using coupled climate models and relate temperature to projected effects on growth and survival of brook trout, brown trout, and rainbow trout. This is timely information, given the importance of managing streams for thermal resilience in a changing climate. The connections among the ITAS, the ITMP, and this recent paper are numerous, and I gave a formal presentation on them at the recent Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, held in Grand Rapids, MI (January 24-27). Troy also gave a presentation, and we had the chance to meet and discuss our writing assignments for the ITAS and the ITMP. We’re happy to report that as of yesterday (January 31), the first draft of the Research Report is complete. 65 pages and counting, with many more interpretations, conclusions, and tables to add. We’ll keep you posted as our work on the Research Report and ITMP progresses!

Lessons learned since “The Fresh Fish of Bellaire”:

  • Context, context, context
    • Stand-alone results from social surveys are interesting, but they become truly valuable for fisheries management when researchers interpret them in the context of previous studies. The recent Wisconsin trout angler survey has provided invaluable context for understanding results of the ITAS.
  • Embrace professional networking opportunities
    • My work with Michigan DNR mentors has been rewarding and eye-opening … a wonderful supplement to my formal education on campus in East Lansing. I encourage all aspiring natural resource professionals to network with veterans of their profession. Events like the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference provide valuable networking opportunities. But it doesn’t end there. Contact natural resource professionals in your area to learn about how to get involved. You won’t regret it!

Andrew Carlson

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“The Fresh Fish of Bellaire”

Just over one month after the Coldwater Resources Steering Committee (CRSC) meeting, I made another scenic journey to Michigan’s northern Lower Peninsula. The destination for 12/1/15: Bellaire, home of Shanty Creek Resorts, where the 2015 Michigan DNR (MDNR) Fisheries Division Meeting took place. As soon as I walked beneath the enormous wooden entryway and sensed the unmistakable fragrance of the northwoods, I knew I was in for an enjoyable morning. I entered a cabin-like hallway replete with photographs and paintings of hunting expeditions of yesteryear. I admired the meticulous detail and impeccable accuracy of deer, ducks, and grouse, those animals of endless fascination. In a wildlife dreamland, I slowly made my way to the meeting registration table. To my surprise, there were nametags featuring clear, crisp images of common Michigan recreational fishes and bags with an embossed Michigan DNR Fisheries Division logo! Quite a professional event, I said to myself, thinking of my many undergraduate meetings with the Minnesota DNR (first as a volunteer, then as an employee) during my days at the University of Minnesota. The stage was set for a memorable meeting.

The meeting featured sessions for various Committees of the MDNR, including the Trout Committee, where I presented full results from the 2015 Inland Trout Angler Survey. Whereas my talk at the CRSC focused on differences between angling group members and non-members in Michigan streams, in this presentation (PDF:CRSC_TroutCommtalk) I characterized the factors that drive typical, “overall” anglers to fish streams and inland lakes for brook trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, lake trout, and splake. I discussed anglers’ responses to a wide range of questions, including those related to angling experience, fishing trip planning, stream and lake selection factors, harvest and tackle use patterns, and overall satisfaction with trout management in Michigan. I was grateful to hear from managers that I provided the details they sought, information that will help us understand the values, attitudes, and behaviors of public stakeholders as we develop a statewide management plan for inland trout. Another incredible Fenske Fellowship experience!

It has been highly rewarding to see that my research is relevant for fisheries managers. As I reflect on my Fenske Fellowship experiences thus far, four lessons come to mind:

  1. Know your audience
    • A professional presentation is valuable in proportion to how effectively a speaker communicates with his/her audience. In transitioning from my first to second presentation, I made a more conscious effort to consider my audience (i.e., salmonid managers) and the specific information they desired. I am certain this improved the quality of my second talk.
  2. Speak with passion, confidence, and creativity
    • In my experience, professional talks represent outstanding opportunities to channel personal enthusiasm toward effective scientific communication. Speak with your heart, and good things will happen!
  3. Address questions with honesty and an open mind
    • At the Trout Committee meeting I received a thought-provoking question about the degree to which my sample population (N = 4,161) accurately represented Michigan trout anglers. Knowing that survey respondents were typically male, age 50-65, and members of angling groups (and invariably provided their emails after purchasing licenses), I responded to this question to the effect that my sample population was not fully representative. To expect a completely representative population is unrealistic, but it is important to acknowledge the inherent biases in a survey and transparently communicate these to audiences at professional meetings.
  4. Learn and have fun!
    • The MDNR fisheries community is a wonderful group of passionate scientists, managers, and biologists who care deeply about the health of aquatic resources within and outside Michigan. Collectively (and in many cases individually), these fisheries professionals are a walking encyclopedia of information. For a Ph.D. student like myself, networking with the MDNR fisheries community is an incredible extracurricular experience. I’ve learned facts about fisheries research and management that no amount of classroom instruction could provide. And I’ve had lots of fun!
      • In a festive, holiday-themed room, members of the Michigan DNR Trout Committee discuss results of the 2015 Inland Trout Angler Survey after my presentation.

        Trout Committee

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Finding Inspiration

Windsor, Ontario

Law Enforcement Committee Annual Meeting

I was eager to give the Law Enforcement Committee members a synopsis of my symposium at the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting last month. I described the objectives and structure of the symposium in addition to comments and questions generated by the audience. The committee members were pleased that they were well-represented at the fisheries meeting. The members also recognized the importance of maintaining this type of representation and exposure at future fisheries meetings. The committee members made me feel like my Fenske Fellowship project has been successful thus far. I think they are looking forward to see what we can do together in the future.

Sometimes I wonder if my research is going to produce meaningful results; results that can be used and will actually impact something or someone. Sitting in this meeting and listening to the questions, concerns, and stories discussed by the committee members reaffirmed, for me, that my research is important. I think I am finally at the point where I can successfully define meaningful research objectives and goals – without the experiences the Fenske Fellowship has provided for me, I fear this realization may have never come.

We ended the Law Enforcement Committee Meeting with another training. The objective of this training was to instruct the committee members on the proper identification of turtle species in the Great Lakes Basin Region. I do not encounter turtles very often in my research, so the species identification was difficult for me. My favorite turtle was the snapping turtle, mainly because it was the largest and most active of those we observed.

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A common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentine). Photo credit: Molly J. Good

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A wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta). Photo credit: Molly J. Good

LESSON #25: Fisheries law enforcement is just one component of fisheries management. All components must collaborate and work together to implement effective fisheries management.

LESSON #26: The GLFC Law Enforcement Committee is interested in learning about how it can improve fisheries law enforcement on a basin-wide scale.

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Congratulations!

East Lansing, Michigan

Congratulations to the two new Fenske Fellows, selected for the 2015-2016 school year! Please welcome Master’s student, Elle Gulotty, and Ph.D. student, Andrew Carlson, to the Fenske community!

Elle will work on a project with her graduate advisor, Dr. Dan Hayes, and her Fenske mentor, Dr. Tammy Newcomb from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Andrew Carlson will work on a project with his graduate advisor, Dr. Bill Taylor, and his Fenske mentor, Dr. Troy Zorn, also from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. You can follow both of their Fenske adventures here on this blog.

Congratulations again, Elle and Andrew!

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Presenting in Portland

Portland, Oregon

I just came back from the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon. The meeting was spectacular and I made a lot of progress on my Fenske Fellowship work.

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A nice, warm welcome from the city of Portland, Oregon. Photo credit: Molly J. Good

On Monday, August 17, 2015, I gave the first presentation in my symposium entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” Ten other presentations followed after mine. The symposium session was extremely well-attended, with approximately 20-40 individuals present at any one time, and each presenter was challenged with some excellent questions. I think we were successful in raising the profile of fisheries law enforcement on a national scale, and I am eager to pull together the research findings from this symposium into a manuscript for Fisheries Magazine. For a copy of any presentation in this symposium, please contact me at goodmoll@msu.edu.

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Enforcement Officer Mark Robbins presenting the last talk in this symposium, entitled, “Fisheries for the Future: How Can Law Enforcement Help Us Get There?” Photo credit: Molly J. Good

On Thursday, August 20, 2015, I showed a brief video entitled, “Legally Licensed: The Conservation Benefits of Buying a Fishing License” in the first AFS Film Festival. The idea for this video originated in one of the earlier meetings I participated in with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) Law Enforcement Committee.

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A snapshot of my brief video. If you would like to see the full version, please e-mail me at goodmoll@msu.edu. Photo credit: Steven Good

Lastly, I organized another Fenske Fellows get-together for the Fenske Fellowship Committee and past fellows. Fenske Fellowship Committee members Gary Whelan (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Jess Mistak (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Dr. Dana Infante (Michigan State University), and Fenske Fellows, Dr. Abigail Lynch (United States Geological Survey), Hanna Kruckman (Eastern Illinois University), Dr. Amy Schueller (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), me, and Andrew Carlson dined at the Hilton Hotel in Downtown Portland.

Fenske_Breakfast

(From L to R) Dr. Abigail Lynch, Hanna Kruckman, Jess Mistak, Molly Good, Andrew Carlson, Gary Whelan, Dr. Dana Infante, Elle Gulotty, Dr. Amy Schueller, and Ray Schueller.

LESSON #22: Nationally, law enforcement officers experience challenges in effective collaboration.

LESSON #23: Law enforcement success or effectiveness is hard to quantify.

LESSON #24: It is possible for your purse to be stolen anywhere, even in nice hotels.

View Molly’s presentation, “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability,” given the American Fisheries Society Meeting here.

View Molly’s summary of the AFS Law Enforcement Symposium entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” here. This summary appeared in Fisheries magazine in December, 2015.

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Project Planning

East Lansing, Michigan

I wanted to share some details about the two primary projects I have been working on…

Law Enforcement Symposium

With help from Bob Lambe (GLFC), Dr. Bill Taylor (MSU), and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC), I have designed a half-day symposium on fisheries law enforcement for the 145th American Fisheries Society (AFS) Annual Meeting. The symposium is entitled, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” I have asked nine individuals to be a part of this symposium, and they have all accepted my invitation. These individuals represent different sectors, ranging from federal and state law enforcement to provincial and tribal law enforcement programs. As part of this symposium, I have submitted an abstract for a presentation that I will give, entitled “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability.” I hope the AFS Organizing Committee understands the significance of this symposium and associated presentations and decides to include them as part of the final meeting agenda.

Strategic Evaluation of the GLFC Vision

Bob Lambe, Dr. Bill Taylor, John Beck (MSU), and I have met a few times to discuss the need for a joint meeting between the Commissioners and Secretariat to lead a strategic evaluation of the vision of the GLFC. We have tentatively planned to hold a retreat in Ann Arbor, Michigan in early April to talk about the role of the GLFC in the future facilitation of coordinated fisheries management in the Great Lakes Basin. John Beck and I have developed and discussed a detailed agenda5 for us to use at this retreat, which will guide the Commissioners and Secretariat in their discussions.

LESSON #17: An organization’s vision and mission should be evaluated often to make sure that the organization is maintaining its role and functioning effectively for now and for the future.

View Molly’s submitted abstract for her symposium, “Fisheries Sustainability, Crime, and Enforcement: Whodunnit and How Do We Manage It?” here.

View a list of Molly’s invited presenters and their affiliations, presentation titles, submitted abstracts, and brief biographies here.

View Molly’s submitted abstract for her presentation, “Law Enforcement: A Critical Management Tool for Ensuring Fisheries Sustainability” here.

View Molly’s draft agenda for the GLFC Retreat here.

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Congratulations!

East Lansing, Michigan

Congratulations to Molly J. Good, the new Fenske Fellow for the 2014 – 2015 academic year. Molly is a Ph.D. student in the Department at Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. As a Fenske Fellow, she will be working with her graduate advisor, Dr. Bill Taylor, and Bob Lambe, Executive Secretary of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) on a project regarding fisheries law enforcement, binational governance, and fisheries sustainability.

Congratulations again, Molly! The Fenske community is pleased to have you as a new member!

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Fenske Friends

Québec, Canada

Each year, at the American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting, past Fenske Fellows come together with the Fenske Committee for a get-together, whether it is a breakfast or luncheon. This is a great way for the Fenske Fellows to get to know each other and learn about each other’s research and past Fenske projects.

At the 144th American Fisheries Society Meeting in Québec, Canada, I organized a get-together with a group of past Fenske Fellows. We ate lunch at Bello Ristorante, a delicious Italian restaurant. Fenske Fellowship Committee Members, Dr. Dana Infante (MSU) and Jess Mistak (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), and past (and present) Fenske Fellows including Hanna Kruckman (Eastern Illinois University), Dr. Abigail Lynch (United States Geological Survey), Dr. Amy Schueller (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), Marissa Hammond (Michigan State University) and me dined together.

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(From L to R) Dr. Dana Infante, Dr. Amy Schueller, Marissa Hammond, Jess Mistak, Hanna Kruckman, Dr. Abigail Lynch, and Molly Good.

LESSON #5: Do not believe that GoogleMaps is always right.

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Progress at the Palmer House

Chicago, Illinois

Annual Meeting

Each summer, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) holds its Annual Meeting. The Annual Meeting is probably the highlight of the GLFC meeting schedule because it showcases the successes and progress the GLFC has made over the past year. Thus, the Annual Meeting is full of back-to-back presentations detailing a variety of topics, mainly completed projects, interesting and relevant research project results, and innovative ideas and concepts for future research projects.

There is usually an Executive Meeting and Luncheon at each Annual Meeting. The Executive Meeting is normally open to Commissioners and Secretariat members only, though I was able to attend (because of my Fenske Fellow status, I have received admittance into many of these private meetings!). During this meeting, the Secretariat members give brief presentations on the status of each of the programs they manage to the Commissioners. For example, Dr. Marc Gaden (Communications Director and Legislative Liaison) gave a presentation on outreach and education events sponsored by the GLFC in the past year. Dr. John Dettmers (Director of Fisheries Management) gave a presentation on the status of the GLFC Fishery Research Program.

The Palmer House Hilton Chicago is breathtaking! While I was there, I used my time at the Annual Meeting to meet individually with Bob Lambe (GLFC) and Dr. Bill Taylor (MSU) to discuss my experiences with the GLFC thus far. I expressed to them that my involvement in meetings such as this one has helped me gain a better understanding of the structure and function of the Commission. One of the highlights of this trip was a special reception at the Shedd Aquarium in downtown Chicago, Illinois. I had a wonderful evening eating good food and watching the dolphins swim.

Palmer House Hilton

Beautiful view of the ceiling in the Palmer House Hilton lobby. Photo credit: Molly J. Good

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The dolphin pool at the Shedd Aquarium at night. Photo credit: Molly J. Good

My status as Fenske Fellow does not officially begin until September of this year. Therefore, I have been grateful for the opportunities to learn about the GLFC through observation and active participation in these meetings. I am looking forward to developing the relationships I have made with the GLFC Secretariat, U.S. and Canadian Commissioners, and the Law Enforcement Committee.

LESSON #5: It is important to ask questions, because that is how you learn. It also helps in making new connections.

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